Tag controlled movement

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Is it Dangerous for Children to do HIIT?

Strength training, not weightlifting

When practiced and controlled properly, strength training provides many benefits to young athletes and up-and-coming sport stars. Strength training is even a good idea for kids who simply want to look and feel better. In fact, according to extensive research, strength training can put children on a ‘lifetime path to better health and fitness’.

When is it the right time for children to start their anaerobic exercise and training?  image supplied by Orthodox Union

When is it the right time for children to start their anaerobic exercise and training?
image supplied by Orthodox Union

Weightlifting, bodybuilding or powerlifting must not be confused with Strength Training. These activities are driven by competition, with participants striving to lift heavier weights or build bigger muscles than those of other athletes. This type of exercise is not for the young ones. It can put too much strain and pressure on young muscles, tendons and areas of cartilage that haven’t yet turned to bone, nor developed correctly yet. This is paramount when incorrect technique is used just so a heavier and larger amount of weight can be seen as an achievement.

For children, light resistance and controlled movements are best. There must be a special emphasis on proper technique, controlled movements and guidance. Your child can do many strength training exercises with his or her own body weight instead of machines or equipment.

Encouraging your child to do BBS (Body By Science), might be a great idea with the focus on controlled movement, and a lighter more manageable weight. This will encourage strength building instead of muscle building, and will help to combat possible health implications in the future.

Teenagers can benefit from BBS, lighter weight

Children can benefit from short, high-intensity workout spurts to boost anaerobic capacity, with the key focus on movement control, muscular strength, and other physical attributes.

Adults and teenagers, may need to place a greater emphasis on improving their muscle aerobic capacity as oppose to children. Children’s muscles recover rapidly from high-intensity exercise, and possibly is the reason why children are able to do repeated exercise and activities when most of us adults continue to feel exhausted.

There may also be important health implications for developing children. Metabolic diseases, including diabetes and many forms of cancer, are increasing in prevalence in teens and younger adults but are still rarely seen in children. If the child continues to do strength training, anaerobic exercise as well as the bursts of aerobic exercise (which children do automatically), into their teen years, maybe we’ll see a decrease in these terrible diseases. It might be the case that the loss of muscle aerobic capacity between childhood and early adulthood is a key maturation step that allows metabolic diseases to take hold.

If your child already accompanies you with your BBS workout, let us know how its going. And if you’re about to start, keep us in the loop with the progress!

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