Tag near infrared

1903: The Nobel Prize for Light Radiation

A Nobel Prize Winner for the use of Light Radiation

In 1903, the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was granted to Mr Niels Ryberg Finsen to acknowledge his contribution to the treatment of diseases, especially lupus vulgaris also known as tuberculosis luposa, with the use of concentrated light radiation.

Tuberculosis luposa

Tuberculosis luposa are painful skin lesions with a nodular appearance. These are found most often on the face: around the nose, eyelids, lips, cheeks, ears and neck. It is the most common Mycobacterium tuberculosis skin infection. The lesions may ultimately develop into disfiguring skin ulcers if left untreated.

Mr Niels Ryberg Finsen, the Nobel Prize winner for Physiology or Medicine 1903: for the use of light radiation

Mr Niels Ryberg Finsen, the Nobel Prize winner for Physiology or Medicine 1903

Niemann–Pick disease

Mr Finsen suffered from Niemann–Pick disease. This inspired him to sunbathe and investigate the effects of light on living things.  Nieman-Pick disease is a subgroup of lipid storage disorders called sphingolipidoses. This is where harmful quantities of fatty substances, or lipids, accumulate in the spleen, liver, lungs, bone marrow, and brain.

As a result, Finsen is best known for his theory of phototherapy. According to this theory, certain wavelengths of light can have beneficial medical effects.

His most notable writings were Finsen Om Lysets Indvirkninger paa Huden (“On the effects of light on the skin”), published in 1893., and Om Anvendelse i Medicinen af koncentrerede kemiske Lysstraaler(“The use of concentrated chemical light rays in medicine”), published in 1896.

The Eykandi crew are currently developing new and innovative ways to harness the goodness from Light radiation, Photo-Bio-Modulation and Near-infrared treatments.

Watch this space and get in touch with us if you’re interested too…

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